Crochet Anatomy

When it comes to crochet, let’s face it, there are so many things that you can learn. And sometimes, if you think you know it all (not in a bad way), something new comes along and blows your mind. True fact. It’s limitless!

I’m going to be honest here and tell you that even I didn’t know all the parts of a crochet hook, well the correct name for them anyway. So I thought it best to do some research and put together some scientific diagrams (thanks COVID-19 homeschooling for refreshing my memory) to help you out.

Stitch & Hook Anatomy – Worked in Rows

As seen above, there is a lot to remember, but this can be applied to most crochet stitches. See below for more.

Stitch & Hook Anatomy – Worked in the Round

Working in the round is my forte. I do love it and find there’s something soothing about it. Although, that’s not the case all the time when I’m designing. You have to make sure that you don’t have too many stitches or not enough stitches, kind of like Goldilocks – it’s gotta be just right in order for it to work out.

A simple rule that can be applied by in most basic round designs, is that each round increases by the number of stitches you started in the first round.

Example: Look at the above photo, there are 15 stitches in round one. So round two will have 30, round three will have 45. Let me type it clearer, because when you see it written out properly, it makes more sense. I’ll do a basic circle for a few rounds. Feel free to crochet along and test it out.

Round 1: Make a magic ring, ch 3 (counts as dc/tr here and throughout), 14 dc/tr in ring, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(15 dc/tr)
Round 2: Ch 3, dc/tr in same st, 2 dc/tr in each stitch around, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(30 dc/tr)
Round 3: Ch 3, dc/tr in same stitch, dc/tr in next stitch, (2 dc/tr in next stitch, dc/tr in next stitch) repeat this around, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(45 dc/tr)
Round 4: Ch 3, dc/tr in same stitch, dc/tr in next 2 stitches, (2 dc/tr in next st, dc/tr in next 2 sts) repeat this around, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(60 dc/tr)
Round 5: Ch 3, dc/tr in same stitch, dc/tr in next 3 stitches, (2 dc/tr in next st, dc/tr in next 3 sts) repeat this around, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(75 dc/tr)
Round 6: Ch 3, dc/tr in same stitch, dc/tr in next 4 stitches, (2 dc/tr in next st, dc/tr in next 4 sts) repeat this around, join to top of ch 3 with slip stitch.
(90 dc/tr)

Repeat in this manner for future rounds. Have a look at the numbers in bold. Notice how they increase by one on each future round. Each round will increase by 15 stitches.

By following the above pattern, you’ll have an obvious seam and see where you increased quite easily. You can hide that by placing your increases in random places on each round, but by keeping the same pattern going, increase, stitch in next x stitches around, just make sure you have the correct number of stitches per round.

Stitch & Hook Anatomy – Granny Square Anatomy

The above granny square is worked in rounds, without turning after each round. Find out how to hide the seam and have a neater looking granny sqare by clicking here.

I hope that you have learned something from the above information and will be something you can refer to in the future.

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